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The low cost of membership with the high return on investment makes this one of our easiest and best marketing decisions year after year. Showcase your organization with a presence in printed publications, Visit Anchorage Visitor Information Centers, at monthly networking events and online at Anchorage. Calendar Editor Alejandra Buitrago alejandra anchoragepress.

The Anchorage Press is an Anchorage-wide news, features, arts, entertainment and recreation paper. Established in , the Press is printed weekly on Thursdays and distributed at over locations. Advertising Account Executives Bridget Mackey bridget. With the exception of syndicated features and cartoons, the contents of the Anchorage Press are copyright by Anchorage Press. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the express written permission of the publisher.

Through the lenses of nature, art, fashion and pop culture, Camouflage: In Plain Sight expands beyond the familiar associations of camouflage to explore how we work to be seen and unseen. Celebrate the opening of the exhibition Camouflage: In Plain Sight with a costume party and artist interventions.

HE INDUSTRY was waiting on the last piece of the puzzle when it comes to beginning the recreational cannabis market in Alaska—the testing facilities that will grade and greenlight the product we will see in retail locations across the state.

Right now, the only testing facility that is licensed with state and local government is CannTest, LLC. All went as projected and CannTest is open for business as I type, allowing cultivators to test their waiting product that will then make its way to retail shelves across the state.

CannTest is led by Dr. Mark Malagodi, a scientist with a background in business and a passion for having a safe and informed consumer base. He is joined by Dr.

Jonathon Rupp, the scientific director of CannTest, who plans to use cutting edge technology to empower the consumer in the decision making process with the most accurate analysis of cannabis products. When it comes to a regulated market, this is a quintessential part of the process. I believe in the medicinal benefits of cannabis.

Having my own business over the last 20 years and learning from that venture showed me that this is an opportunity I could not pass up. Rupp and myself we have all the needed experience required to be successful in this industry. Potency refers to the percentage of the psychoactive component Tetrahydrocannabinol THC and also the Cannabidiol CBD content in any sample that is tested. Knowing the potency of the product allows consumers to customize their high and make educated decisions when navigating a regulated market.

Microbial testing ensures that the product is free of mold and bacteria such as E. The same goes for edibles, which cannot exceed the dose limit of 6 mg per serving, as set by the Marijuana Control Board MCB. Originally, the board imposed a limit of 5 mg per serving for edibles, but after testimony from the testing facilities upped the limit to 6 mg per dose to account for variance in testing.

CannTest offers terpene testing for those cannabis connoisseurs in the industry, as well as additional CBD potencies not required by the MCB regulations. CannTest will also accept samples to be tested from an unlicensed grow, provided that the sample is submitted in person and their identifying information is verified so it can be tracked within their laboratory management system.

MCB stipulations prevent them from accepting any personal grow product from unlicensed operations off the road system or through the mail. This safeguards them on a federal level in regard to what is outlined in the Cole memo—a document that advises states how to partake in a regulated cannabis market with little to no fed-.

Right now the MCB is in talks with TSA and the feds to regulate people traveling with marijuana within the state, and how to manage licensed facility transfers for those who do not live on the road system. The last hurdle for CannTest to clear was laboratory approval through the Outside agency A2LA, a California company contracted by the state. That is what was holding us up at that moment. Cynthia Franklin worked on making this happen for us by sorting out the language surrounding the difference between the two evaluations that A2LA is completing and helping to push the approval through.

Everyone wants to see us in business as soon as possible and we are thankful for that. With the approval and operation of testing facilities we will finally see product that not only has to meet regulation requirements, but also allows consumers to gain knowledge surrounding the products. With consumers making informed decisions, we further societal support of normalizing responsible adult use in our communities.

But before you hit the slopes or the trails, please remember, November is Avalanche Awareness Education month. They are mothers who lost a child in an avalanche in Alaska. And they are not alone. There have been 49 people lost in snowslides since There were six fatalities during the - season.

Sons, daughters, wives, husbands, friends … All people that set out for a fun day of snow adventures and never got to come home to ride another day. It was 30 years ago, November 26th, , when I lost my husband Bruce after a frozen slope collapsed and buried him. He died from severe trauma and the only thing that likely could have saved his life was more awareness and education about the potential hazards. When my children grew to be teenagers and were riding snowmachines, skiing and boarding in the mountains around Alaska from Hatcher Pass to Thompson Pass, I realized that it was often just a lack of knowledge that killed people in avalanches.

They were all simply in the wrong place at the right time. Since I have been on a mission to help make snow safety knowledge commonplace and available to everyone. Today I serve as the director of the Alaska Avalanche Information Center working every day to get this information out to the public.

On Saturday, November 5th you can take part in the annual SnowFest! This winter, start your season out right by tuning up your mountain travel skills, checking out the new technology available and learning everything you can to avoid having your mother, wife, husband or friends endure the toughest of lessons in life far too soon.

Take the time to get educated so you can Live to Ride Another Day. Learn more at AlaskaSnow. Suite Anchorage AK Intersted persons should submitwritten comment to their local governing bbody, the applicant and to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board at West 7th Ave, Suite Anchorage AK It quickly became clear that someone had been killed—a woman.

The word was that she had been found nude from the waist down. Police said she had been sexually assaulted and dumped, and they warned women to be careful out on the street. She moved to Anchorage at 18 and loved the social life here. Lake drank heavily at times, used drugs and traded for sex. She was known as a street person although she had moved into Karluk Manor. Friends describe Lake as very outgoing and say that she loved to have fun and make everyone laugh.

She called her family back home regularly and kept in touch with her daughter. I mean, it was there all day long. The whole neighborhood was coming and going, trying to talk to the police, coming up to the scene. It just went on all day.

It was very emotionally, extremely draining to watch the van be parked there all day long. Like it must have been a really intense scene to have to process. They said that she had been raped and murdered and that there was a big concern.

That people, the street people, needed to be really careful. I was surprised because that was different from what was being printed in the newspaper. But it should not matter at all how these women made their money—what matters is that they are missing or murdered and have not received justice. This is nothing new. A Anchorage Daily News article about the large number of deaths of homeless people that year addressed rumors of a serial killer.

Sine Anahita—who researches inequalities at the University of Alaska Fairbanks—explained that institutionalized racism in investigations is often unintentional. Anahita said that being a street-involved person, a sex worker and a drug user all carry oppressions similar to systemic racism: People who have fewer of these intersecting [identities] have greater life chances. How many rape kits are unprocessed right now? Heckendorn arrived in Alaska in after graduating from college to work on Representative Andy Josephson's District 15, D political campaign.

During his time in Alaska, Heckendorn realized that there was a gap in locally available consultancy. Heckendorn runs the business side of things, while Corbett takes the lead on anything creative. It kind of gradually evolved, ramping up and really getting going in the assembly races this past year. Leading up to the election they got busy doing communications consultancy and building up their portfolio. Toward the end of , the pair started assembling a team. First was the addition of projects manager Courtney Owen in November of Owen is a super-volunteer who has worked on numerous political and civic engagement projects.

Her passion for local politics was first ignited in high school. Aside from teenage rebellion, Owen was largely influenced by her love of music, specifically the riot grrrl musical genre and movement. It cast a wider net than I expected. DeOctober 27 - November 2, She also proofreads media pieces and sits in on strategy sessions. It kinds of reels you in.

About a year later John-Henry called. Jillian Banner was a creative intern who worked under Corbett, while year-old Peter Heckendorn, younger brother of John-Henry, worked with the group during the assembly elections and impressed multiple candidates with his poise and knowledge. Current interns Genevieve Mina and Shea Siegert worked with the group over the summer through the primaries. Ship Creek Group has been busy during their first year running campaigns.

You get a list and cross-reference it to anything and everything.

Anchorage Press 10/27/16 by Wick Communications - Issuu

No 'singing between the lines', Hamell comes at you with a punch and this one is his best right hook. Straight into my pile of Best Albums of the Year. Hamell is a showman who shocks. He's a wild weapon of communication - an urban folk-punkster, a thrash-rocker who fires songs at you which are not exactly hot on forgiveness and compassion. He strums like a man possessed, he's outrageously funny and utterly compelling. Choochtown feels very ' live ' though some tracks are supplemented by drums, bass, electric guitar, trumpet and samples.

Let's face it, this isn't sensitive stuff, so if you in the mood for something pretty and singer-songwritery, this one isn't for you. On the other hand, if you like your songs honest, bad and bloody - and you think Bob Dylan, Lou Reed or Loudon Wainwright are a little tame these days, Hamell's your guy.

This man is brilliant and he's at The Borderline again on November 2nd. Finally, a joke from Hamell's on-stage, mostly unrepeatable banter, " What has four legs and an arm? As Rebecca Hollweg's other half, he also played on and produced her album June Babies. Now he's finally made his own and, not surprisingly, several friends dropped by to return the favour.

It takes a few listens, but it sneaks into the bloodstream. And it goes without saying double bass aficionados should purchase forthwith. The quite-newly-launched Cherry Red subsidiary label Esoteric is currently doing a splendid job of reissuing all the albums of celebrated songwriter Josephine Claire Hamill, who was also quite recently hailed by Record Collector mag as "the finest vocalist you've never heard" yes, I do like the presumptive eloquence of that description!

As a taster, though, comes The Minor Fall, The Major Lift, a handsome two-disc retrospective compilation covering virtually the whole of Claire's career to date to and spanning the records she made for Island, Konk, Beggar's Banquet, Coda and finally her own label. If I'm totally honest, I don't entirely connect with some of the prog and then New Age modes with which Claire became engaged from the late 70s through to the late 80s, a blandness too far on occasion for me perhaps, but the sample tracks from the albums made during that period encapsulate what she was doing pretty well.

In all, it's actually a very sensibly programmed compilation, and certainly whets the appetite for the forthcoming projected complete reissues of all the individual albums over the next year or so and prompts a re-evaluation on my part. And even Claire's staunchest fans will probably not own all of those albums! So to those issued thus far One House Left Standing was the product of the ingenuous Claire's signing with Island at age 16, and ambitiously showcased her nascent songwriting and her enviably pure and uncannily cultured singing voice on an unexpectedly wide-ranging set of songs, mainly penned by Claire herself some with her then-boyfriend Mike Coles.

The record started out stylishly, with the kittenish Dixieland swing of Baseball Blues whoa, what an opener! It's a persuasive set that wears very well indeed, and its ten tracks are topped up with two bonus cuts, the lengthy and intense single B-side Alice In The Streets Of Darlington and a cutglass cover of Lindisfarne's Meet Me On The Corner featuring Gerry Rafferty and Stealer's Wheel as backing musicians.

A more pronounced Joni Mitchell influence also seemed to be present, especially in the melodic contours of songs like To The Stars. There are some sensitive string arrangements too courtesy of Nick Harrison , and the final track Peaceful was even recorded alfresco in the cold in the middle of the night! The odd-track-out is a quite strident cover of Jimmy Reed's Baby What's Wrong With You which, well done though it is, breaks the flow of the album's original second side somewhat.

Sadly, there are no bonus tracks with this reissue - but, as with One House The third of the reissued albums, Voices, propels us forward 12 years to , by which time much water had flown under Claire's musical bridge.

At that time, Claire was settled and married, and had just supported Rick Wakeman on a national tour. At the instigation of her husband Nick, Claire dipped her tentative toes into the then-nascent New Age genre, recording a whole album based around the concept of a vocal interpretation of the changing seasons.

Using then-pioneering layering techniques to create a thick, ethereal soundscape from her own extraordinary vocal performances, Voices proved a startlingly original record which genuinely broadened musical horizons, astounding listeners and defying preconceptions of what might "sell".

Heard now, it seems a verys artefact, rather akin to Kate Bush without the outlandish eccentricities I thought, and definitely a precursor of what's now regarded as the Enya sound especially in its wash of swooning, shifting vocal colours - but it doesn't sound dated in the way that much 80s music does, and it contains some inspiring and uplifting composition.

From the vantage point of two decades on, it's easy to underestimate how inventive and original this music was back in the mids, and this repackage allows us to reassess its magic in all its aural splendour. The fourth album to be reissued in this series, Love In The Afternoon, dates from , a time when Claire was on a creative roll after the massive success of the Voices album.

It's a collection of songs without an overall concept, and although it doesn't suffer from disunity in that sense and there are some fine songs among its nine tracks it still doesn't quite satisfy as an entirety. Trees, Japanese Lullaby and to some extent Glastonbury and the title track are to some extent all style-defining within Claire's later output, but the album's standout is probably Beauty Of England which is drawn from an aborted concept album Domesday, about the Battle Of Hastings.

Love In The Afternoon shares with many albums of its time a distinctly 80s synth-dominated backing, which now makes it sound quite dated more so than Voices , and this dilutes the impact of Claire's writing somewhat for me. It would be interesting to hear some of these songs with a less elaborate textural backdrop.

Best known for a string of albums on Island Records in the early seventies, Middlesborough vocalist Claire Hamill has never stuck rigidly to one formula, reinventing herself along the way as New-Age songstress, occasional rock-chick singer with Wishbone Ash and conceiving the remarkable 'Voices' album, which featured multi-layered arrangements of Claire's erm, voice!

Released in , her most recent studio album sees Claire return to the comparative comfort zone of singer-songwriter mode, yet several of the songs in this collection stand comfortably alongside the best of her earlier work; the jazz-tinged 'Beautiful Moon' featuring the moody trumpet of Duncan Mackay, a song which would not sound out of place on a record by Madeleine Peyroux or Diana Krall and the bright 'In the Leaves of the Park', as crisp and clear as a brisk Autumn walk.

Claire obviously has a keen ear for a cover and her little-girl-lost vocals are perfectly suited to 'Blue' from the pen of McAlmont and Butler. We also get another chance to hear the beautiful 'You Take My Breath Away', re-recorded due to the renewed interest in her work largely thanks to the surprise discovery of a recorded version of Claire's song by the late Eva Cassidy. There is an air of melancholy throughout much of this album, even on the uptempo 'Mr Wonderful', but it is an emotion that Claire handles better than most.

On the closing track, 'Singer', she proclaims "where did you go, I used to buy your records many years ago. She's been likened to Bush, Harvey and Lennox as well as Regina Spektor and Imogen Heap, and while you'll hear the comparisons, she's still very much her own voice.

The album is an exotic musical journey, brushing the multicultural world wings of dreamy celestial pop tinged with Gaelic mist Exist , cobwebby jazz soul folk The Bush infused Pick Me Up , airy Brill building balladry There It Is , the panoramic rhythms of African plains How Beautiful , and the melting icicle soulful ebb and flow fragility of Deeper Glorious.

Then there's the Weill cabaret shades to All In Adoration with its puttering percussion beats and woodwind trills, the classical hymnal majesty of Liathach's choral beauty and, drawing on her time in Cambodia, the intoxicatingly hushed seductiveness that is Mekong Song. She's releasing Winter Is Over a a trailer single, a playfully catchy pizzicato plucked strings waltzer that suggests a sort of Oriental Bjork by way of an arthouse 40s Broadway musical.

But it's the closing Think Of Me that's the real deceptive killer, a windchime, musical box Gaelic lullaby that floats you away on a pillow of clouds and twinkling night stars. Sophisticated, sensuous, complex, layered and utterly beguiling, there's a song here called Paradise.

A better description of the album would be hard to conjure. Well there's certainly plenty evidence of a rock edge and drive here, but his roots are certainly showing, too. Just seven songs of high quality combine a Guy Clark-like fondness for characters and story-telling with a very twenty-first century musical approach.

Three tracks of random radio stuff "reception 1", etc don't make too much sense to me; I guess it's an attempt to make the songs seem like random unknown voices from the ether too. Nonetheless, bags of atmosphere are conjured from some pretty sparse ingredients; Nathan's warm, slightly fractured vocal on Cinders is sung right up against the mike and supported by an arrangement of great delicacy shot through with steel - reminiscent, I suppose, of one of Lou Reed's painfully intimate songs.

If Cinders was on your mp3 and popped up out of the blue I think you'd have to stop what you were doing to drink it all in. Weary World, on the other hand, demonstrates an ability to make an apparently simple, straightforward tune and lyric carry an awful lot of emotional weight, not an easy trick to pull off whilst Change could have come from Nels Andrews' songbook; it has a similar weighty, considered style to the acoustic guitar sound, an echo-laden pedal steel for the atmosphere and an acute sensitivity for the disappointments experienced in real lives - a long way from the vacuous optimism of pop music.

Receive, in contrast, gets the electric guitar brought out and a pretty fuzzy, heavy sound backed by a thumping drum; Nathan's vocals have the edge required for a very good rock voice and the warmth that draws you in for the quieter, folkier songs. It's a slow-burner, this one, and it'd be well worthy buying or downloading what you can and familiarise yourself with Nathan Hamilton's style before you check him out live; there's hidden treasures here and I think the man could be a real find.

It's a bit over two years since Peter's last solo studio recording Incoherence , but he's been busy over that time, not just with the VdGG reunion tour and remasters but also in supervising the remastered reissues of his 70s Charisma solo albums. All despite having suffered a heart attack, an experience which no doubt played a part in triggering this new set of songs on which Peter reflects on mortality and on considerations of history both personal and public. With admirable, if typically cryptic succinctness, Peter admits that "the main theme here is the long dive down into not being what we were", and in confronting this situation I think he's produced a very fine set indeed, one that ranks with those Charisma albums in actual songwriting power yet doesn't possess anything like the impenetrability or degree of turn-off idiosyncrasy that many music-lovers had often found such a barrier to appreciating his earlier output.

That doesn't mean to say that Peter's abandoned the experimental elements in his music - indeed, the urge to forge new and intriguing sonic landscapes is as strong as ever eg the fragmented voice and treated-piano textures of White Dot ; and Singularity is once more a totally solo effort, all instruments and voices you hear belonging to Peter himself.

Lyric-wise, the Hammill hallmarks of literate and expressive heart-baring are there in abundance, yet imbued with a new maturity in their freshness of execution. What was once a distinctly inward-looking narcissism is replaced by a worldly realism, often quite self-critical and definitely not devoid of humour. Peter's metaphors are still intelligently conceived, but they're inclusive not opaque, and the music expresses a fragile tenderness amid the sometimes still painful recollection and assessment of a personal situation.

Peter uses the key word "singularity" in both senses: At its most intense as on Event Horizon , Peter's writing exhibits an expressive beauty that's both accessible and immensely compelling. Now if in the past you were put off more by Peter's intensity, by way of his histrionic vocal delivery, than the actual admittedly often impenetrable content of his songs, then I firmly believe that Singularity may be the album to now give you the optimum chance to re-evaluate his music - for although it's still recognisably Hammill, the actual expression of the drama and thought-content within the songs is toned down naturally not in any way dumbed down, I hasten to add and, allied to some genuinely interesting musical content, makes for a most rewarding listening experience and hey, Naked To The Flame even contains a snatch of tune we can whistle along with Peter!

But that doesn't for a moment mean that Peter's compromised his ideals or his talent. Singularity is a grand achievement by any standards, flying defiantly in the face of those who'd argue that anyone who's been writing and recording for 40 years is bound to have nothing new to say.

Following in quick succession barely a month after the previous batch, here's the second tranche of Peter Hammill remastered reissues, covering his four solo releases which originally came out between March and October The album does, however, at least seem to audibly begin where Nadir's Big Chance left off, in the sense of throwing at us the proto-punk riff-heavy vibe of Crying Wolf.

Over comes with three bonus tracks: Coming complete with some striking cover photos like the front shot which I always thought made PH look like Kenny Everett! Although there's often a distinct sense of trial-and-error about much of the album, it's amazing how it hangs together and although it's not my favourite Hammill album by any means, it nevertheless retains an aggressively confident quality right through.

The two bonus tracks, spare versions of album tracks If I Could and The Mousetrap taken from the Kansas City tape, exude an intense self-containment. The followup, pH7 which turned out to be Peter's final album for Charisma , appeared just over a year later, in October ; Peter regarded it as a twin to Future, and certainly it contained a rather similar mix of experimentation and social commentary.

Its at once punning and misleading title it was PH's eighth album not his seventh! It began, however, with two for PH less characteristic tracks: My Favourite, a fairly lightweight pop-love-song with slightly laboured imagery redeemed by a charming string arrangement, and then the declamatory new-wave stance of Careering. Thankfully there's stronger material to come: Not For Keith is a brief but affecting tribute to VDGG's first bass player Keith Ellis; Handicap And Equality harks back to the social-commentary folk-troubadour approach, whereas The Old School Tie is an even more obvious attack on politicians and the dawn of spin, imbued with all due venom and bile.

Imperial Walls, a setting of 8th century Saxon words found displayed at the Roman baths at Bath, has a scratchy grandeur all its own. Compositionally, the album's odd-man-out is an old song of Chris Judge Smith's Time For A Change , but it's a tribute to Peter that it suffers not from the comparison with his own songs. A Black Box, released in the late summer of , was a go-it-alone independent-label effort, self-released on S-type Records almost as a gesture of frustration at the albeit inevitable situation of being dropped from Charisma due partly to the ever-familiar story that although Peter's albums were critically esteemed, his music wasn't deemed commercially viable.

Like most of Peter's music, it can at times be tough going but it invariably rewards the patient listener. In common with the previous batch of Hammill digitally remastered reissues, the above four are state-of-the-art, and sound better than ever. All sleeve art and lyrics are faithfully reproduced, and the reissues benefit from Peter's own commentary within the booklet notes. Listening to these albums again in sequence I experience an embarrassment of riches, a torrent of ideas and feelings that's truly overwhelming.

Peter's songs are singularly dramatic, turbulent, restless, angst-ridden utterances, yet they often possess much quiet beauty both musical and lyrical amidst all the torment. The second and third and suitably lengthily-titled! Chameleon, though a typically introspective collection, is compared with some of his earlier VDGG work less concerned with wilful sci-fi obscurity and more with the deeply personal; if it were issued today, I suspect it would probably fall most readily into the indie category notably in respect of the occasionally brittle nature of the home-studio-produced sound and its primitive, much-of-its-time approach to stereo imaging , but that's not in any way to denigrate its many abundantly impressive qualities.

As Peter himself admits, he was "stumbling under the guidance of instinct as much as conscious innovation", although "many of the moves he made at this time were to prove pivotal in his later development". Like all of Peter's work, it's music of startling, nay frightening originality. In matters such as his distinctly independent spirit and obstinate integrity especially I often hear a kinship with significant mavericks like Bowie and Harper, but the truth is that for the most part Peter's songs sound like absolutely nobody else's, even though there may be elements and echoes of modern-day chanson flooding through pieces like In The End and the sinister pastoral of What's It Worth.

And he was at first slow to distance himself completely from VDGG, as Easy To Slip Away with its throwback to the personae of Refugees and In The Black Room a song originally destined for the band's next, unrecorded - intended fifth - album, with its grandiose, episodic nature and band dynamics both show in their different ways.

Chameleon may be the first real fruit of Peter's potential solo career, but it's an astonishingly assured and coherent album. Even at a temporal remove of some 30 years, it's almost too much to take in at once: This remastered edition comes with three bonus tracks: The third bonus track Rain 3 AM is an unreleased curiosity from around the time of the album: Peter's pulsating electric guitar work on this track in particular betrays the influence of Spirit's Randy California, who made a one-off guest appearance on another of the album's key tracks, Red Shift.

Of the four bonus cuts, three are versions of album tracks which come from a roughly contemporaneous Peel session with David Jackson in tow , the last The Lie being another delightfully over-the-top selection from the abovementioned Kansas City concert. In Camera was the first Hammill solo album on which everything aside from percussion on just three tracks was played by Peter himself.

It continues the startling advances made on The Silent Corner, notably in terms of wild experimentation, while the sheer scope of its material bravely presents the listener with at times uncomfortable challenges in the form of extreme contrasts, from the relatively orthodox reflective confessional of Again to the rockist angst of Tapeworm, the intriguing guitar-quartet setting of The Comet, The Course, The Tail to the ultra-synth texturings of Faint Heart And The Sermon, and the strange but logical pairing of the harmonium-rich Gog misprinted as Go on the back cover - oops!

Three bonus tracks, taken from a Peel session recorded shortly after the album's release, are sparse voice-and-piano readings of two of the album's songs plus a real rarity: Though released in February , barely six months after In Camera, Nadir's Big Chance saw the Chameleon mutate dramatically into Rikki Nadir, a kind of proto-punk alter-ego!

The album comprised a set of by Hammill standards pithy quasi-pop-songs though in practice few of them weigh in at under four minutes! Not unnaturally, it was received with some puzzlement and a degree of antipathy, but in retrospect, although it's not necessarily Peter's finest forty-seven minutes, I really rather like it for what it is - and it sounds great in this remaster, even though it yields no bonus tracks.

The digital remasterings of these four albums have been carried out by Peter himself, and he's opened out the original slightly thin sound with far better presence, notably in certain of the bass frequencies, and the bonus tracks are well worth having; these sensibly-coordinated reissues, which are graced with additional new notes by Peter too, are state-of-the-art.

A few months after Nadir, VDGG ended its four-year set-aside, and the Godbluff lineup was to take up most of Peter's time for a year or so; a convenient point at which to break my survey of Hammill remasters - the next batch will appear shortly.

This has actually been a really difficult record to review, basically since it's nigh impossible to capture the incredibly individual essence of Brighton-based Mary's wildly original and very very special talent as a singer and songwriter. It's also one of those "less is more" jobs that makes much out of exceedingly minimal resources. And it's a seriously scary experience from beginning to end - at times it's almost too disturbing to listen to at all except in the comfort of your own mind.

But the first thing you'll hear, after the bald tenor guitar intro that is, will be Mary's totally extraordinary voice, which will bring your ears stark upright, for it takes the art of singing into an unearthly place indeed you'll either love it or hate it with a passion, I suspect - and I love it! It's a voice of paradoxes: Mary's writing - and indeed her whole sound-world - is peculiarly haunting. Imagery is spellbindingly strange, both significantly eldritch and properly poetic, sometimes ostensibly impenetrable but always keeping a firm handle on the boundaries of perception.

Melodies sound primordial, ancient, modal, yet with adventurous turns of the screw. The feel of the music, and some of the instrumentation Mary has at her command, is imaginative and often distinctly ISB for instance, there's a gorgeous swooning cello line on Honey that just cries out to be played on bowed gimbri!

A small complement of extra musicians including Alice Eldridge, Jo Burke, Alistair Strachan, Grant Allerdyce and co-engineer Joe Watson supplement Mary's guitar, being used eminently selectively and to brilliant effect. Perhaps the most striking marriage of words and music comes on The Bell They Gave You, but every song here has much to offer in terms of aural and verbal stimulation and even the interpolated samples on Free Grace and the cryptic Exeunt don't grate or disrupt the album's curiously logical flow.

Features that might in lesser hands become just a gimmick here prove essential to the impact of the songs - for example, the hidden track Encore For Florence a weirdly touching tribute to celebrated "tuneless, tone-deaf soprano" Florence Foster Jenkins sets a parlour piano amidst the faux-crackle of an ancient 78 in the manner of a fusty attic discovery.

And maybe the strangest and most immediately memorable among the host of strange songs, is the acappella Ballad Of The Talking Dog, which takes the time-honoured "bunch of green holly and ivy" refrain from the domain of classic folk balladry and twists it around multiple vocal chords to the creepy accompaniment of hand and mouth percussion, with spectral whistling, discords and spoken counterpoints - it sounds like the Addams family singing a Child Ballad at their fireside on a bleak winter's evening!

Like the whole album in fact, this track is at once soothing and discomforting. All in all, an extraordinary record: Wayne The Train Hancock is one of those guys who believes in doing things the old fashioned way. Well, at least when it comes to recording. Extended sessions in the studio are not for these boys. A Town Blues was recorded in 20 hours and mixed in two days.

Bloodshot Records, their new label, might even be accused of providing them the luxury of extra hours. Well, at least a couple of them. The reason that he's able to do this is that the band is a hard working outfit travelling the road performing more than most. The net result is that all their albums have a spontaneous feel well, they would, wouldnt they and a bunch of songs that have matured with performance on the road. A recipe that has worked fine for all of their albums.

At the production controls, this time, is Lloyd Maines who is favoured by many of our country music friends in the US. Rightfully acknowledged on this album as The Professor for all his sterling work in this area. He closes out the album accompanying Wayne to get the regulatory forty minutes of CD time on Railroad Blues.

A track that's as live as you'll get. So, if you havent gathered already, the music of Wayne Hancock is country - the honky tonk way. All styles are here. The up tempo songs swing along with a highlight in Miller, Jack And Mad Dog warning of the dangerous effect of the demon drink and driving combination. There are lonesome ballads such as Happy Birthday Julie which has the singer passing on congratulations to the girlfriend who left him and got killed in a car crash. Mr Hancocks pen accounts for ten of the tracks with the others including Cow Cow Boogie which was made famous by Ella Mae Morse who was popular in the s and 50s.

This gives you a good clue as to where this band are positioned. Yes, its traditional honky tonk in all its flavours with great songs done just like a live show. The odds have to be that Hand - whom Willie Nelson describes as the 'real deal' - will remain as unfazed and unaffected as his music by the acclaim that will surely follow The Truth Will Set You Free. While the revolutions of Americana, 'big hat' country and 'nu country' have swirled around him, James Hand has steadfastly remained true to the heart and soul of old country, the kind that served Hank Williams, Lefty Frizzell and Ernest Tubb so well.

While a 'career' musician, one who has done nothing else in his life, may have to search long and hard for the truth of his songs, Hand has to look no further than his own life. He has also drawn deeply on a lifetime's experiences at the 'unknown' end of the musical spectrum, James Hand isn't showbusiness, to echo Nelson's wise words, he's the 'real deal'.

This collection of a dozen originals gives a small overview of Hand's work, his country music encompasses the whole range, beginning with the wonderfully light and sunny swing of Banks Of The Brazos and ending with When You Stopped Loving Me, So Did I, not only a classic country title but a song that could be as old as country music itself.

Without Hands's tender touch it could easily have been swamped by corn, however three chords and the truth never hit home quite so sharply. There's almost a novelty factor in listening to an artist play pure, undiluted country music, no whistles no bells, just plain old, from the heart country. James Hand may have taken 40 years to get intot he studio but I'll bet it doesn't take another 40 for him to be back. Drifting away to Brett Spark's dark baritone on the opening cello waltzing Linger, Let Me Linger I was transported back to the days of the old school doo wop crooners like the Ink Spots, melting in the warmth of the unbridled romanticism captured in lines like "I am the puddles in the street waiting for your falling leaves".

Recorded for their 20th wedding anniversary, it's an album of admittedly often skewed love songs, steeped in spirituality and the rich loam of nature with metaphors and images of spiders, birds, trees and foliage.

Indeed, the pedal steel keening Little Sparrows talks of schools of shining fish, swarms of buzzing bees, geese and ants with love painted as Jonah on the raging seas embracing the whale that comes to swallow him while the twangy, Johnny Cash evoking Wild Wood has them conjuring a stone age love nest of stick and bones as he declares he will "bark like a dog in your arms.

Invested with their longtime Louvin, Stanley and Everly influences, songs like When You Whispered carried in the traditional arms of banjo and pedal steel with bluegrass waltzes and mountain music slow dances, it's a marvellous testament to the couple's devotion to both each other and their musical roots.

Nothing here falls short of wonder, but particularly deserving of mention has to be A Thousand Diamond Rings with its surf guitar noir mood, the Spanish classical guitar and gothic melancholy of The Winding Corn Maze more swarming bees, here and the 40s ragtime lounge whistling shuffle of The Loneliness of Magnets, an inspired image of separated lovers.

Here's to their 25th. Over the years they've been musical partners Brett and Rennie Sparks have built a reputation as one of the world's finest purveyors of melancholy Americana, their music conjuring images of dust hung desert nights and Appalachian mountains silhouetted against the evening sky as they sit round the camp fire singing songs of loss, death and damnation. So, a surprise then to find the new album a relatively more upbeat affair, noting a world waltzing towards self-destruction but celebrating the small and infinite moments of beauty and wonder that nature provides to soothe the soul's fears.

Using such instruments as mellotron and wine glasses and drawing on the sepia tinted worlds of hillbilly, tin pan alley ballads, cowboy country, western slow waltzers and, on Beautiful William, even medieval tunes, Brett crafts the careworn honky tonk melodies upon which songs like Somewhere Else To Be, Bowling Alley Blues very George Jones and Your Great Journey are built.

Meanwhile, Rennie takes lyrical inspiration from the life of Nicola Tesla, the electrical engineer and scientist who invented alternating current transmitters but whose ambivalence to the world let him to become a recluse in his hotel room, unable to bear the touch of human skin. However, as she notes in the waltzing Tesla's Hotel Room from where comes the album's title, one day he opened the window and befriended pigeons, finding his way back out of the darkness.

It's that contact with the universal her songs explore. Unfolding in airport lounges the throaty Neil Young-like All The Time In Airports , bowling alleys Bowling Alley Bar and graveyards White Lights , she tells stories of hunters shooting prey that transforms into their true love Hunter Green , of shoes hung over telephone wires These Golden Jewels and post apocalypse life After We Shot The Grizzly , striking emotional chords from such images as a black glove on the cliffs, broken cheap sunglasses, and 'a small bag of onion rings'.

Existential, metaphysical, whatever, the Sparks dig beneath the dry clay and turn dulled stones into diamonds. A thing of wonder indeed. The Handsome Family - Singing Bones Loose Now suitably based in Albuquerque, Mexico, baritone Brett Sparks and his ethereal voiced lyricist wife Rennie follow up 's breakthrough death ballads collection Twilight with yet another collection of poisoned dark country melancholia that reinforces their reputation as the Johnny Cash and June Carter of contemporary Americana..

If you've not encountered them before, then try and imagine a rocky mesa at dusk, cacti and stark jutting Appalachian mountains silhouetted against the evening sky, the sound of rattlesnakes occasionally breaking the silence, dust gathering in your throat, an empty whisky bottle in your hand and the death angel sitting round a camp fire with an acoustic guitar singing of the souls that have passed this way en route to damnation.

This time round they've fleshed out the sound somewhat, pushing the boat out by adding musical saw and pedal steel to the basic mix of guitars, keyboards and drums mandolin and such regular embelishments as auto harp, bango and violin.

But the landscape remains mich the same with its dark valleys, black hills, and creeping shadows a perfect backdrop to songs that explore the "veil between this world and the next" on numbers such as the whippoorwilling waltz Hour Store where the sleepless and the lost push their trollies as the crying ghosts of dead shoppers flit in and out the aisles, the cowboy dying in the desert on the clacking chugger The Song of a Hundred Toads or the farmer lowering himself down The Bottomless Hole behind the barn where dead cows, garbage and tractors seem to fall forever.

Texas Gothic at its finest, there's no better wallow in gallows humour and death balladry to be had this side of Nick Cave.

This duo's fourth album In The Air was one of the listening highlights of for me, and this new one coincides handsomely with a UK tour. Husband and wife team Brett and Rennie Sparks make very strange music that's at once comforting and unsettling, smooth and caustic; it's both seriously weird and weirdly serious. Kinda like an unpardonably sweet, easy-on-the-ear gothic country, but lots more addictive than that tag might imply - try to imagine Johnny Cash singing Beefheart lyrics!

Brett's is the golden voice, and he also plays almost everything in sight, while Rennie seems to content to pen those peculiarly poetic lyrics while contributing occasional vocals and autoharp. The songs contain some exquisite imagery, which often appears inconsequential but is actually finely crafted, while musical settings are by turns mournful There Is A Sound , sinisterly jaunty All The TVs In Town and creepy Gravity , often running counter to what you'd expect from a cursory reading of the texts.

With typical oddball directness, the insert helpfully explains that "this CD was recorded at home on our Macintosh G You must experience the uniqueness of the Sparks Family's vision at least once in your life! Formerly leader of 80s Newcastle upon Tyne underachievers Hurrah! Little short of a modern day hymn with a soaring arms-linked swaying chorus that builds to a jubilant, uplifting finale as he sings 'let now every heart rejoice', it's hard not to find the words Rufus, Wainright, Buckley and Jeff rising unbidden to the lips.

The same is true throughout the album where you might also see parallels with Martin Stephenson with whom he's collaborated on a Grant McLennan tribute , but which unfolds to reveal him as very much his own man.

Indeed, that hymnal quality is also forcefully to be heard on the no less outstanding Midwinter's Feast with its hallelujah chorus, lines about church bells and wheezing harmonium and the closing piano backed, emotion quivering Peace In Our Time as he sings "God bless our bombs and the guns we are firing, caught in the crossfire of lies we told.

Dealing in themes of love, loss uncertainty and disillusion, the album's musical textures are simple but rich. The opening piano ballad Beautiful Thing hints at Brel and Buckley equally you could also imagine hearing it on an early Scott Walker album , Darkest Night is brooding, muscular bluesy soul flecked folk, River Of Song harks to Irish trad folk swayalong while acoustic Americana warms the heart of The Slow Road and the yearningly gorgeous Whisper In Your Mind with its pedal steel and Paul Heaton colours.

There's not a weak moment here but it would be remiss not to also make special mention of Let The Lights Go Down, a spare, romantically bruised acoustic song of pleading and resignation that features shared vocals with Maria Yuriko and curls around the ears like aural aromatherapy. Hopefully it won't mirror Hurrah! Let now every heart rejoice, indeed.

This at first seems a confusing record. It's labelled as "Chinese folk revival", and, whilst it certainly emanates from Beijing, its inspiration derives comes more from Mongolian folk music.

Hanggai the name describes an idealised grassland landscape of mountains, trees, rivers and blue skies is a group of young musicians, mostly from Inner Mongolia. Aiding Ilchi and his tobshuur two-stringed lute in his endeavours are horsehair-fiddle morin khuur player Hugejiltu and deep bass singer Bagen music students steeped in the traditional music , with Xu Jinhchen sanxian , Hexigtuu sihu , further assisted by producers Robin Haller and Matteo Scumaci who add electric and bass guitar, banjo and programming.

The latter hints at the nature of Hanggai's treatments of the traditional material, with authentically spare basic textures augmented by percussion, occasional western influences and natural and street sounds from the surroundings Beijing. It's little wonder that Hanggai have attracted a cult following in China amongst those seeking an antidote to Chinese boy bands!

Some tracks sound true-traditional Wuji is just voice chanting against a wailing fiddle line , whereas My Banjo And I great title!

Some western-style twang guitar embellishes Five Heroes, while Flowers builds on a hypnotic, driving lute rhythm; the rather gentler melody of Haar Hu could almost be a Mongolian version of Scarborough Fair, and - most fun of all - there's even a raucous, madly accelerating Drinking Song.

Maybe it shouldn't work, you say, but it does - and I get the strong feeling that this is but the start, and that there's plenty more territory yet to be explored in this creative and genuinely exciting reinterpretation of traditional Mongolian music.

What if music had smells? If CDs were impregnated with an aroma that embodied the essence of the sounds. Motorhead would be leather, axle grease and sweat, Lucinda Williams would be the smell of tarmac intermingling with fresh cornfields, Radiohead would be antiseptic and anything from the Pop Idols stable would, of course, be a ripe processed cheese. If that were the case then playing the Dogs would fill the room with the scent of leafy English country lanes, the grass glistening with dew, raindrops from a summer shower dripping from leaves on the trees, a clean freshness in the air.

Comprising Andy Allen, formerly a jobbing member of the Pistols and Professionals, his ex-lover Joanna 'Piano' Pace, and his but not her daughter Lily Ramona, it's been four years since the South London trio emerged with their Joe Boyd overseen debut, Bareback, on his Hannibal label. Reviews glowed for their fusion of English folk rock, celtic country and the sort of midwest American gothic embodied by Matthews Southern Comfort, underpinning lyrics of a generally downbeat mood.

However a cancelled Rankins tour on which they'd been booked as support followed by label problems, took the edge off what should have been fast lane progress up the folk roots ladder.

Now they're back via a different licensing deal, still with Boyd keeping a watchful eye, and while there's times when the mix has a few too many rough edges, if the wheels turn smoothly there's no reason why this shouldn't elevate them to the hallowed ranks of artists such as the Indigo Girls, Dear Janes, the McGarrigles, Poozies, Michelle Shocked, and the early incarnation of Suzanne Vega.

Evoking worthy comparisons to the likes of McTell, Thompson and Martin Taylor, Allen's nimble fretwork dances all over the album, cascading arpeggios, tumbling lullabies, meditative strums, bluegrass banjo, steel strings twanging and resonating under his fingertips.

Here and there the acoustic guitars are coloured with mournful woodwind, hand percussion, cello, dulcimer, and double bass but mostly they're left to weave their own spells, the women's voices - sometimes in harmony, more often with Piano's dust and creekwater wearied whispering tones taking lead - providing the real complementary textures.

Her songs haven't exactly found the sunnier paths of life, but as the album title, Whole Way where they express the optimistic hope to ' sell a lot of records ' and even death song Little Door " I wouldn't say the world has opened up, just a little door but it's enough " hint there's at least rays of light coming through and any darker concerns are well shaded behind the generally sprightly tunes.

Spanning English trad folk flavours and appalachian mountain music Let Alone Me , it's hard to pin down prize tracks from the 12 contained here, but pushed to name favourites then the repeat play button hits on the haunting Half Smile with the two women weaving witchy, dank forest harmonies as a flute threads its way between the spaces, the resigned Women Who Love Too Much as Fred Neil meets Sandy Denny , Singers shades of Leonard Cohen and early Judy Collins and Hollywood , a dreamy tale of empty success, self-deceptions and those left behind in the road to fame on which Allen takes lead vocals, his timbre and phrasing sounding not unlike Billy Bragg.

It's a beguiling, intoxicating album, inhale and breath in deep. If you can't aurally picture that, then just think Ottawa's Lucinda Williams with a pinch of Gillian Welch and you'll have a good idea of what lies inside the CD case.

Songs about busted relationships, broken dreams, temptations, growing older and the slippery search for redemption, delivered in world weary dusty tones, it's a fine collection of roots country tinged here and there with bluegrass banjo courtesy of guitarist producer David Baxter and, on opening track When Lovers Leave and the waltzing backwoods folk Three Times Bent, from Toronto's Justin Rutledge.

She gets bluesy on Rest Of My Days, lover's revenge murder ballad Mary Mary and the swampy Southern groove of Riptide and ups the tempo for the slide and banjo picking of No More Rain, but to these ears it's the gentler, wistful bruised heart ballads that are the strongest. The undulating Here We Go Again distils the uncertainty of entering into a new romance while still picking up the pieces of the last, Just For The Ride brings a jangle and twang to a yearning for the innocence of young love unaware of the hurt ahead while the album's final three numbers, the London set Somewhere A Lovely Flower, Off This Train and, conjuring memories of Kathy Mattea, Lilacs Dancing move from the search for self and happiness to a memory of being found.

It's not a groundbreaker, but her laid-back acceptance and honest delivery will make heartbreak's twilight hours easier to bear. Seems a fair way of describing the Ottowa native's album of Americana and a soulfully warm voice that's drawn comparisons with Mary Chapin Carpenter and Gillian Welch. With instrumentation built around acoustic guitar, dobro fine picking by Chris Barkely , pedal steel, upright bass and stripped down percussion, Hanson fluidly moves her musical moods between twangy roots country Eleven Months , rustic American folk Dance In The Evermore , bluegrass Cold Touch and country blues Willow Tree' revisiting of murder ballad Pretty Polly , all sounding equally assured whether she's standing tough or hiding vulnerability.

Love, life, mortality, religion and, on Tears In Your Rain, environmental concerns provide the subject matter and, if she's not rewriting any thematic concerns, she does find the human heart in the stories she tells. And if there's no single career making standout, the lovely sadness of Seeking Juliet and More Of The Same and a gravel gritty Nazareth Bound will certainly ensure her name gets mentioned in the right places.

Out of Ottawa sporting comparisons to Gillian Welch and Mary Chapin Carpenter, Hanson recently picked up a Canadian Blues award for River By My Side which she didn't actually write but while the blues also puts in appearance on the commitment-fearing Little Stage Fright it's her Americana and Texas soul-country moods that really flavour this debut album.

Recorded with unfussy production and unshowy playing that gives it a live feel, her songs are a mix of well observed snapshots and seemingly more personal reflections on relationships that have slipped or are slipping away, ranging from the aching Different Story where a couple meet at a barroom to sign the divorce papers and the lost dreams detailed with a finely observant eye on the twangy title track to the regrets of the backwoods country-folk Fell Down A Wishing Well one of several featuring Lynn Miles on backing vocals and the comfort and healing to the lilting, pedal steel laced Just A Day Away.

Fine though it is, I'm not convinced that the album really needs her cover of the traditional gospel folk tune Wayfaring Stranger, a song that may have a thematic connection of sorts but feels as though it's strayed in from a live set list.

That said, the fact that a song that's weathered the years as well as it has can be overshadowed by Hanson's own material, says as much for her songwriting credentials as the album does for her singing.

Even so, as a talented Gothenburg-born multi-instrumentalist and prog-rock genius, Bo is certainly best remembered today for his first solo release, Music Inspired By Lord Of The Rings , which the Famous Charisma Label took high into the album charts back in That album was reissued last year by Virgin, and now it's the turn of the three remaining solo albums which originally appeared on Charisma in the UK to appear in digitally remastered new editions. Watership Down' s bonus track is an eleven-minute live-in-the-studio Migration Suite.

Sadly, and unusually for such reissues, the booklet notes don't give us any information regarding the sources of the bonus material. The downside of this is that some of Bo's musical ideas and themes don't quite achieve the memorability quotient that they need to stand out in a competitive prog marketplace, and whilst one can admire his versatility and creativity some of the later music, particularly on Watership Down , has a tendency to ramble and in the end leaves me a touch cold.

The Watership Down album continued to explore the wave of inspiration that had begun with Attic Thoughts' Rabbit Music, and Bo utilised his musical collaborators to good effect, but in truth it was a more uneven effort musically, and by the time of its release distinctly unfashionable.

But these reissues at least give us the chance to reassess Bo's place in prog history, and I find that I can certainly appreciate them a lot more now than I did at the time of their original release. From Cork and now based in Glasgow, Hara's very much in the tradition of the classic acoustic singer-songwriter, a deft string picker, a voice with a slight emotional crack and songs that slide down easy but also hang around to get you pondering their relationships themed lyrics.

It's not about to make him the next darling of the modern folkie set, but numbers like the circling melody of Bribe, the fresh open fields air to Nothing New, What Will Lie In Wait where he actually conjures thoughts of Ian Matthews and the clear stream waterfall colours sparkling across Blue Heart of Mine and The Light will always ensure a welcome on the folk club and pub circuit. Coming together as a three piece house band for a regular event at St Pauls Church in Derby and gradually evolving into their current sextet format, they've largely spent their career to date on the Christian music circuit, releasing debut album Leaving Safe Anchorage last year.

However, given the exposure, their sophomore should easily see them expanding their audience into the contemporary folk-rock mainstream. Fronted by the striking, dust and silk vocals of Bethan Court, obvious comparisons would have to include Fleetwood Mac, Kate Rusby, and Sandy Denny but you might also hear hints of Judy Collins and Eva Cassidy in there too. Listening to her on the gently rippling autumnal Another Rainbow or the world weary Sweet Hand of Mercy is a bit like bathing in aural Radox, the soothing sound of late summer evenings and fireflies.

The band's other prime strength lies in the songs of Phil Baggaley, sometimes quietly melancholic at others shimmering with a sense of joy and determination; wistfully veined with themes of loss and stalled emotions on Watching It Slip Away, Mayday and the wonderful waltzing title track or celebrating the redemptive nature of love on the tumbling folk pop of Five Senses and the simple wonder of the universe in Stargazing. There's times when he calls to mind Julie Gold. Having said that, two numbers hark to traditional English folk ballad.

The Storm Gate is tale of a Whitby boy sailing with Captain Cook while his intended waits at home, verses sung by both the lovers and the lad's sister. And, arguably the album's standout track, Gunmetal Grey is a brooding warning not to harden your heart that, with its steady drum beat, electric guitar and the edge Court brings to her singing, would add lustre to a Steeleye Span album.

These two highly regarded young musicians originally met as teenagers, but only last summer, while teaching at the Folkworks Summer School, did they consider doing some actual duo work together. And by all accounts, so naturally did the two gel that after just a couple of days of playing this CD emerged! Meantime, Rob's continued his involvement with the English Acoustic Collective and Emma's been teaching and performing both in the UK and her motherland Sweden.

This disc turns out to be an intensely uplifting experience that fully conveys the joys of informal music-making. The majority of its ten tracks are duets for English concertina and fiddle: The CD also showcases two descriptive pieces by the musicians themselves: All told, this is a genuinely exciting disc which it'll prove hard to grow tired of, for with each twist and turn of melody Rob finds felicitous subtleties in his chosen instrument and Emma's joyous, earthy phrasing springs new surprises.

Rob's also responsible for the superbly immediate and close recording. To vary things a bit, Ghost Writer turns in four minutes worth of discordant, clanking beatnik jazz Tom Waits with a sprinkle of Bowie, but opening proceedings with the gentle summery sway of Bittersweetheart for the most part he again favours the dreamier side of melody in which to couch his songs of love and loss, of death and, well, life really.

Mercifully for the Samaritans then, the lad does manage to curl a couple of more positive moments round his fingers, Watching The Sun Come Up is a buoyant post break up song but still sees Ed ready to "attack the day with the will to burn" and on the gorgeous lullaby Metaphorically Yours with its crooning ooohing backing vocals, he sings "if my wrists were slit you'd bandage them with style and grace", adding "I confess I love you so.

This is an unusually distinctive album by a British band based in Berkshire that is unafraid to take chances and diversify within the broad compass of Americana. Sure, it's got its own oddball tendencies, but for most of its length it's a reliable and intriguingly different album on which influences are less worn on the sleeve than sewn away neatly in the cuff. It would be considered an interesting album purely because every track's different, but the consistent quality of the songwriting transcends any novelty-value and the occasional quirk of presentation.

Pete clearly feels for his protagonists and translates this concern into the settings and the expression he brings to the lyrics: I could live without the gimmicky distancing and scratching effects given to the vocals at times, but in the end these probably don't intrude seriously enough to spoil my appreciation of atmospheric songs like Are Those Really The Miles? Respond to Ana's letter.

Let's have an encounter with the enemy. Have an encounter with the enemy. You catch some water in the pail. Catch the water in the pail. You cook some rice for ten people. In her extreme anger, she wanted to strangle a person.

Strangle the wild lion. You load ten people on the jeep. Load your dog in the car. Sumakit ang aking ulo nang marinig ko ang boses ni Josie. My head ached when I heard Josie's voice. Sumaklolo kami sa mga nasalanta ng baha. We extended some help to the flood victims.

You pierce a block of ice. Pierce the cow's chest. Let us stuff some papers in the bag. Stuff some papers in the bag. Huwag kang manaksak ng kalaro mo. You should not stab your playmates. Sumaksi ka ba sa pagkamatay ni Eva? Did you witness the death of Eva? Salakayin natin ang kuta ng mga rebelde. Let us assault the fort of the rebels. You stack the plates in the cupboard. You tell us your story. Tell us what happened to you yesterday. You include some children in our game.

Include the children in the game. You pour some soy sauce in the bottle. Pour the soy sauce in the bottle. Huwag ka nang magsalita laban sa kanya. You should not say anything else against him. Did you meet with them at the airport? Meet your father at the door. Magsalubong tayo sa may harap ng sinehan mamayang gabi. Let us meet each other infront of of the moviehouse later tonight.

Sumama ang pakiramdam ni Ana kaninang umaga. Ana became ill this morning. Sumama tayo papuntang palengke kina Sheila at Rhoda. Let us join Sheila and Rhoda on the way to the market.

You bring along some of your friends for dinner tonight. Bring along Sheila on your way to Berkeley. You should not slap people. Slap the student sleeping in the class. Sumampalataya ka ba sa kanyang sinabi? Did you believe in what he said? You hang the clothes in the bathroom. Hang the clothes in the bathroom. Expresses unreal futurity in the past or doubtful futurity in the present.

You should practise well for your singing. Get used to the hardships in life. You lean the mirror against the wall. Lean the mirror against the wall. You scoop some rice. Sumandok ka ng tubig mula sa tapayan.

You scoop some water from the clay jar. Sumangga siya sa suntok ng kalaban. He shielded himself against the punches of the enemy. You should shield youself from the punch of the enemy. Shield yourself from the punch of the enemy.

Sanggahin mo ang suntok ng kalaban. Shield yourself from the punches of the enemy. You mortgage your watch so you can have some money. Mortgage your watch so you can have some money. You put some bedsheets as underlayer on your bed. Use the bedsheet as underlayer on your bed. You shut the door. Let us now return the rented videos. Return the videos we rented. You memorize ten poems.

Memorize the Philippine National Anthem. Sumawsaw siya ng shushi sa toyo. He dipped the sushi in the soy sauce. Huwag kang magsayang ng pera ng magulang mo. You should not waste the money of your parents. You dance at the bar tonight. Hindi madaling magselos si Hillary. Hillary is not the type who easily gets jealous.

Huwag ka nang magsentimyento sa iyong asawa. You should not feel disappointed with your spouse. Sumenyas ka sa amin kung pumayag ang pulis. You give us a signal if the policeman agreed. Let us build a bonfire here. Set fire on the wood. Let's cook some pork broth. Make some pork broth. Bawal magsigarilyo sa loob ng gusali. Smoking inside the building is not allowed. You shout out loud.

Shout the name of Maria. The horse kicked its hind legs because of fear. Kick your left foot backwards. Magsikap tayong lahat upang ang buhay natin ay umunlad. We should all work diligently so we could have a better life. Sumiksik na lang si Pedro sa punong bus upang huwag siyang mahuli sa pagpasok sa opisina. Pedro crammed himself in the full bus in order not to be late in going to his office.

You cram in some papers inside the bag. Cram your body inside the little cabinet. You should serve your motherland. Serve what you cooked. Monica is fond of peeping through Kenneth's room. Kenneth wants to peep inside Bill's room. Magsimba tayo ng maaga sa Linggo. Let us go to church early on Sunday. Simutin mo ang pagkain sa iyong plato.

Finish the food on your plate. You should now start a new life. You light up a candle. Light up the candle. You should blow your nose so you could breathe better.

Blow your clogged nose. Did you collect payments for all your loans? You insert some money in Pedro's pocket. Insert the money in Pedro's pocket. Huwag kang magsinungaling sa iyong asawa. You should not lie to your spouse. You should not kick on those beside you. Sumipi ka ng nakasulat sa pisara. You copy what is on the blackboard. You brush your teeth before going to bed.

You sip some coke. Ikaw ba ang sumira sa aking damit? Are you the one who ripped my clothes? I am not fond of breaking other people's things.

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