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For many of us, the idea of professional networking conjures unctuous thoughts of pressing the flesh with potential employers, laughing at unfunny jokes, and pretending to enjoy ourselves. No wonder a recent study found that professional networking makes people feel unclean, so much so that they subconsciously crave cleansing products. Previous psychology research has shown that people think about morality in terms of cleanliness. A study found that people felt physically dirtier after recalling past transgressions than after recalling good deeds.

The study's authors called it the "Macbeth effect," referring to the Shakespearean scene in which a guilt-racked Lady Macbeth tries to wash imaginary bloodstains off her hands. Based on their personal schmoozing experiences, Casciaro, Gino, and Kouchaki hypothesized that professional networking increases feelings of inauthenticity and immorality—and therefore feelings of dirtiness—much more so than networking to make friends.

Gino, for instance, recalled colleagues using copious amounts of complimentary hand sanitizer after work-related dinners. The team also posited that networking felt ickier when a meeting was planned ahead of time, rather than a spontaneous occurrence.

We thought the difference was important because one has more intent than the other—and that intent might contribute to feelings of being selfish. The researchers conducted a series of experimental and field studies to test the extent to which networking makes people feel dirty. In the first experiment, participants were asked to recall an event from the past and write about it for five minutes. They were divided into four conditions. In the first condition, participants recalled a time where they intentionally set out to nurture a relationship for professional gain.

In the second, they recalled a time when a spontaneous meeting had benefited them professionally. The third and fourth conditions were similar to the first two, but participants were focused on personal gain instead.

The researchers found that those who had recalled intentional networking were nearly twice as likely to come up with "cleansing" words—"shower," "wash," and "soap"—than those who had recalled spontaneous meetings.

Participants in the spontaneous condition were more likely to create non-cleansing words like "shaker," "with," and "ship. In the second experiment, held in a university research laboratory, 85 students read one of two short stories. Both were written in the second person.

In one, the protagonist "you" went to a holiday party with hopes of having fun and making friends; in the other, the protagonist attended a company party solely to make business connections. Afterward, the researchers asked participants to read through a list of consumer products and rate each one on a desirability scale of one to seven. The list included several specific cleansing items such as Dove shower soap, Crest toothpaste, Windex as well as neutral items like Post-it Notes, Nantucket Nectars juice, Sony CD cases.

On average, participants who read the professional networking story gave much higher ratings to the cleansing products than those who imagined the friendly party. The neutral products received similar ratings across the board. Having proven their initial hypotheses in the lab, the researchers set up camp at a large North American law firm, where lawyers often garnered business via networking engagements.

A law firm is an ideal setting for a field study, Gino explains, because it is designed around quantifiable measures of success: Each of the firm's lawyers received an invitation to complete an online survey that included questions about the frequency of their networking activity, and how it made them feel. For example, " When I engage in professional networking, I usually feel… " was followed by a choice of several adjectives, including "dirty," "happy," "ashamed," "excited," "inauthentic," "anxious," "uncomfortable," and "satisfied.

Of the lawyers responding, 62 were junior partners and 21 senior partners. The researchers measured the responses against each respondent's annual job performance, in terms of billable hours at the firm.

As expected, those lawyers who associated networking with negative feelings tended to engage in networking activities with relatively low frequency. Yet networking had a positive association with job performance: The lawyers who networked the most frequently tended to clock the most billable hours, according to the research.

The data also showed that having a high-power job seemed to dissipate feelings of dirtiness. Compared with junior associates, senior partners reported far less feelings of dirtiness associated with networking. That said, the researchers considered the possibility that these particular lawyers had risen to partner level because they hadn't been turned off by networking.

To further suss out the psychological effect of power, the team conducted a carefully constructed role-playing task, in which college students were assigned to the role of either a low-power employee or a high-powered manager. Each participant filled out a leadership questionnaire from the mindset of the prescribed character. Next, participants were told to reach out to someone in their online networks.

Some were told to send notes via LinkedIn with the intention of nurturing a professional relationship, while others were told to nurture a friendship via Facebook. Consequently, participants fell into one of four conditions: After the online networking activity, everyone completed the aforementioned product preference task.

They also indicated the extent to which they experienced a variety of emotions on a scale of one to five. The results showed that the low-power participants felt dirtier, and had a higher preference for cleansing products, after professional networking vs. But the high-power participants showed a relatively low need to get clean, regardless of whether they had used Facebook or LinkedIn.

The overall findings pose a paradox: Networking makes low-power employees feel unclean, which understandably makes them not want to network. But if they don't network, they may not become high-power employees—who no longer feel dirty when they network. So short of showering in Listerine, what's a low-power player to do? The research team has not yet proven why power makes flesh-pressing more palatable.

But Gino notes that powerful people know they can contribute reciprocal value to most professional interactions. Thus, before attending a networking event, it may behoove low-power people to consider something other than a desire to move up the corporate ladder. In previous research, Gino has studied the effect of framing an idea in terms of promotion "Do this" vs. Now she, Casciaro, and Kouchaki are studying how to frame networking events in a positive light.

In prevention mode, you're thinking about your oughts, duties, and obligations. In promotion mode, you're thinking about growth, advancement, and accomplishments. We are interested in exploring others ways in which such feelings can be reduced or eliminated, given the benefits networking has on people's development, performance, and career. Contact Send an email. Fritz 9 Fox, J. Ronald 1 Frei, Frances X. Warren 14 McGee, Henry W. Kasturi 19 Rayport, Jeffrey F. Career networking can make people feel somewhat noxious about themselves.

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Revenge, Pranks and Dirty Tricks -- Payback is Hell

In the second, they recalled a time when a spontaneous meeting had benefited them professionally. The third and fourth conditions were similar to the first two, but participants were focused on personal gain instead. The researchers found that those who had recalled intentional networking were nearly twice as likely to come up with "cleansing" words—"shower," "wash," and "soap"—than those who had recalled spontaneous meetings.

Participants in the spontaneous condition were more likely to create non-cleansing words like "shaker," "with," and "ship.

In the second experiment, held in a university research laboratory, 85 students read one of two short stories.

Both were written in the second person. In one, the protagonist "you" went to a holiday party with hopes of having fun and making friends; in the other, the protagonist attended a company party solely to make business connections. Afterward, the researchers asked participants to read through a list of consumer products and rate each one on a desirability scale of one to seven.

The list included several specific cleansing items such as Dove shower soap, Crest toothpaste, Windex as well as neutral items like Post-it Notes, Nantucket Nectars juice, Sony CD cases. On average, participants who read the professional networking story gave much higher ratings to the cleansing products than those who imagined the friendly party. The neutral products received similar ratings across the board. Having proven their initial hypotheses in the lab, the researchers set up camp at a large North American law firm, where lawyers often garnered business via networking engagements.

A law firm is an ideal setting for a field study, Gino explains, because it is designed around quantifiable measures of success: Each of the firm's lawyers received an invitation to complete an online survey that included questions about the frequency of their networking activity, and how it made them feel.

For example, " When I engage in professional networking, I usually feel… " was followed by a choice of several adjectives, including "dirty," "happy," "ashamed," "excited," "inauthentic," "anxious," "uncomfortable," and "satisfied. Of the lawyers responding, 62 were junior partners and 21 senior partners.

The researchers measured the responses against each respondent's annual job performance, in terms of billable hours at the firm. As expected, those lawyers who associated networking with negative feelings tended to engage in networking activities with relatively low frequency. Yet networking had a positive association with job performance: The lawyers who networked the most frequently tended to clock the most billable hours, according to the research.

The data also showed that having a high-power job seemed to dissipate feelings of dirtiness. Compared with junior associates, senior partners reported far less feelings of dirtiness associated with networking. That said, the researchers considered the possibility that these particular lawyers had risen to partner level because they hadn't been turned off by networking. To further suss out the psychological effect of power, the team conducted a carefully constructed role-playing task, in which college students were assigned to the role of either a low-power employee or a high-powered manager.

Each participant filled out a leadership questionnaire from the mindset of the prescribed character. Next, participants were told to reach out to someone in their online networks.

Some were told to send notes via LinkedIn with the intention of nurturing a professional relationship, while others were told to nurture a friendship via Facebook. Consequently, participants fell into one of four conditions: After the online networking activity, everyone completed the aforementioned product preference task. They also indicated the extent to which they experienced a variety of emotions on a scale of one to five. The results showed that the low-power participants felt dirtier, and had a higher preference for cleansing products, after professional networking vs.

But the high-power participants showed a relatively low need to get clean, regardless of whether they had used Facebook or LinkedIn. The overall findings pose a paradox: I got a phone call from the middle school today. The voice on the other end was hard to identify because of the sobbing between rushed hysterical phrases. The last time I had a phone call like that, my oldest daughter had been involved in a car accident.

Apparently, someone brought a nasty case of head lice into our quiet, well-behaved school. Rumor has it that it was passed along through the Rosetta Stone headphones. And somehow, the entire girls volleyball team was infested, too. Not at OUR school. And what about all this itching I was suddenly experiencing?! As my daughter ducked into the privacy of the car, the tears started again. And how the same words come to them all. We went home, stripped the linens, threw out the pillow, and quarantined the clothes, hairbrushes and accessories.

My daughter did the nasty lice-killing shampoo, and we settled in for some nit picking. As I went through her hair, strand by strand, I found nothing but a few flakes of dry scalp.

I grabbed a magnifying glass and took a closer look. Being the better-safe-than-sorry type, I ran that unimaginably thin comb through her unimaginably thick hair anyway. Still, no lice, no nits.

A new study finds many people feel physically dirty when networking. But, there are steps you can take to make networking feel more like a. (I Wanna) Feel It All Lyrics: I wanna feel it all / August's light, February's pall / Thrill to the rise and rue the fall / I wanna feel it all / I wanna feel. "I Want To Feel You Inside Me" - It doesn't matter exactly where "inside you," it's just the fact that you said it out loud.